All Articles (6)

 

This issues paper aims to delineate the pathways to diversification and industrialization for Central Africa and to assist the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), the RECs and their member states in the sub-region in…

For the Central African Republic, our analyses have gravitated towards a need for the State to reassert its authority as guarantor of peace and stability (after a three-year drawn out conflict) that would be made possible with the support of the…

Our findings in macroeconomic data trends for Sao Tome & Principe for the year 2015 show the country’s priorities for transformation, unlike for her peers studied above, shouldn’t lie so much in manufacturing but in developing high value…

If the manufacturing proposition holds true for the Republic of Congo, from our 2015 analysis, we’ve gone further to insist on an even greater effort to be made in diversifying the country’s income sources away from the export of oil by taking…

For Cameroon, we’ve argued that even though the shock of the oil glut has been palliated thanks to is relatively diversified economy, the country needs to substantially diversify its export base away from the black gold, bolster its ability to…

Why ECA insist on numbers and context for Central Africa’s structural transformation

The UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have played out this song several times already: Africa needs structural transformation; not growth that is bereft of job creation (and its corollary of social impact), as has been witnessed for sometime now.   

  Our findings on the field in the first batch of Country Profiles that look at economic trends for 2015 in Cameroon, the Central African Republic, the Republic of Congo and Sao Tome and Principe, reinforce our thesis.

 Although our approach toward policy propositions for the seven countries our sub-regional office covers (Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and the Republic of Congo) in the context of Country Profiles is hinged on data, the periodical is not a me-too product. We tease out meaning from the data trends that should be handy for policy planners in the sub-region to interrogate the route they are taking at any given moment, as they seek inclusive economic growth. And this could not have come timelier than now when many of them are fine-tuning their strategies for emergence in the near future. Because we are sworn to putting Africa first, the profiles are being published with the full collaboration of our partners in stakeholder public and non-public institutions that hold the primary data necessary for the exercise.

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